Celebrate Black History Month With These New Titles

February is Black History month. In celebration, why not check out one of these new reads!? Looking for a printable list?  Check out our website where you can find this list as well as other Reader’s Advisory book suggestions.

-Archana Chiplunkar, Adult Services Librarian 

Revolutionary Reads

One January 31 at 7pm, Joel Farkas will be joining the library to give a presentation on George Washington, New Jersey, and the Revolutionary War.  Here are some books to get you into the revolutionary spirit!

This biography of the nation’s first president describes George Washington’s relationship with the Native American tribes, and how the formation of our new nation impacted upon them. The book was a finalist for the National Book Award.

When George Washington hastily retreated from New York City in August 1776, many thought the American Revolution might soon be over. Instead, Washington rallied—thanks in large part to a little-known, top-secret group called the Culper Spy Ring. He realized that he couldn’t defeat the British with military might, so he recruited a sophisticated and deeply secretive intelligence network to conduct covert operations against the British Army and to keep an eye on their movements in New York City, Long Island, and Connecticut.

The thrilling story of the year that won the Revolutionary War. When, by the summer of 1781, it looked like the American Revolution had failed, the naval battles between the French and British, especially the most important one – the Battle of the Chesapeake, largely determined the outcome of the war. In the Hurricane’s Eye reveals that in the end, the fate of the American Revolution depended on Washington and the sea.

The author contends that Benedict Arnold and George Washington were actually quite similar. Both were up-and-comers who craved fame and fortune.He illustrates what he considers were Washington’s weaknesses as a military commander and is sympathetic to Benedict Arnold  even though he betrayed his command of West Point to the British.

This is a riveting and little known story about treacherous soldiers who tried to do in our first president.

This book won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for biography. It covers Washington’s leadership as a general in the French and Indian War, the Revolutionary War, and his role in bringing about the U.S. Constitution.

After leading the Continental Army to victory in the Revolutionary War, George Washington shocked the world by retiring in in December 1783. He then returned to private life at Mount Vernon. The new country was operating under the Articles of Confederation, When the 55 delegates met in Philadelphia to revise the Articles, Washington reluctantly rode to Philadelphia in the summer of 1787 to preside over the Constitutional Convention. The end result was the Constitution of the United States.

In this book the author tells how the first Congress created the Bill of Rights, which are the first ten amendments to the Constitution. The first Congress admitted North Carolina and Rhode Island to the union, chose the site of the national capital, then admitted two new states, Kentucky and Vermont; chose the site of the national capital, created a national bank, created the first cabinet positions and the federal court system; and many other achievements.

–Christine Demidowich, Adult Services Librarian 

Classic Novels

Winter is the perfect time to snuggle up with a long novel.  This winter, why not make the time to read those classics that everyone always feels like they “should read.”  Here are some classic novel suggestions to inspire the more literary side of your to-read pile.  

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell- Over the past few years, I can not tell you how many patrons have suggested that I read this book (or even watch the movie).  Gone gone with the windWith the Wind is a classic romance totaling in at a lengthy 959 pages depending on the edition.  This novel takes place during the Civil War and Reconstruction time period and follows the story of Scarlett O’Hara the daughter of a wealthy plantation owner.     

Rebecca by Daphene du Maurier- This Gothic romance is perfect for those who enjoyedrebecca.jpg Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights. This novel tells the tale of a young girl who becomes the new wife to Max de Winter, only to find that she is not the true mistress of the home as the house and all who inhabit it are forever dominated by the memory of the deceased Rebecca.      

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley – This piece of speculative fiction brave new worldwas originally published in 1932 and is about a psychologically controlled and genetically engineered society of the future.  This novel is on par with George Orwell’s 1984. ana karenia     

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy – This novel is another lengthy one, totaling in at around 837 pages and tells the story of a doomed love affair set in nineteenth century Russia.

-Jessica Bielen, Adult Services Librarian

Warm Up With a Cookbook

Last month we discussed winter themed reads including a historical novel set within the colder seasonal months, a lengthy fantasy novel, and a chilling thriller.  (You can read more about them here.) This month, we are going to focus on books that will warm you (and your home) on cold winter evenings.

Here are some awesome selections for winter time comfort food:

comfort in an instantComfort in an Instant: 75 Comfort Food Favorites For Your Pressure Cooker, Multi Cooker, & InstaPot by Melissa Clark – This  book is full of cozy weekend recipes and soups.  Just perfect to make while it’s snowing outside. With these “set it and forget it” recipes, you can even read by the fire while dinner is cooking!

From Crook to Cook: Platinum Recipes from the Boss Dogg’s Kitchen from crook to cookby Snoop Dogg– Not only is this book fun to read, but it also has a recipe for the ultimate winter comfort food…. baked mac and cheese. Yum!     

american cookieAmerican Cookie: The Snaps, Drops, Jumbles, Tea Cakes, Bars, and Brownies We Have Loved For Generations by Anne Byrn There is absolutely nothing better than the smell of fresh baked cookies in the oven.  Does anyone disagree? Pick up this book and find your favorite recipe!

 

See you soon!

—Jessica Bielen, Adult Services Librarian

Livi Lit

Have you checked out what the Livingston Public Library librarians are reading? Our Livi Lit videos are posted on the library’s Instagram account @LivingstonLibrary and offer readers a quick insight into what they are reading!  

In case you missed it, in the previous Livi Lit video, Librarians Gina and Jessica discussed To Make Monsters Out of Girls, a collection of poetry by Amanda Lovelace, and The Wild Robot by Peter Brown, which was our Xtreme Readers book club choice for grades 4-5!

In the most recent Livi Lit video, librarians Gina and Jessica talked what they are Adultscurrently reading.  Jessica told us about The Adults by Caroline Hulse. This book opens with an emergency call because someone has been shot with a bow and arrow.  But who? And why? In this novel, Claire and Matt are divorced and they have a daughter. The ex-couple decides to go on a holiday with their daughter, her imaginary (and really tall) rabbit, and their new significant others.

the immortalistsGina discussed The Immortalists by Chole Benjamin.  In this novel, four siblings see a fortune teller who tells them each when they are going to die.  This prediction shapes the choices that they make and the way that they live their lives.

So, travel on over to the library’s Instagram, check out what we’re reading, and comment below with what’s in your to-read pile!

-Jessica Bielen, Adult Services Librarian

December Reading Picks: Books For Chilly Nights

When we think of December reads, we often think of the fluffy holiday novel. They’re grab & go, and you can read them in about a day because they all pretty much have the same story line to a degree. But what if you’re looking for something chilly with a little more substance?

Here are a few handpicked reads for the upcoming winter months:

Winter Garden by Kristin Hannah –  Although it might be argued that Kristin Hannah recently grew to literary fame with her two most recent novels, The Great Alone and Twinter gardenhe Nightingale, her older novels are spectacular.  Curling up with this read during the winter months is fitting because of the title, but also because of the story line.  In Winter Garden, you will meet Meredith and Nina Whitson, two sisters who are quite different.  When their father falls ill, their mother, often cold and standoffish, offers  them little comfort. The sister’s find themselves making a promise to retell a Russian  fairy tale they used to love to hear as children.  This then begins to unravel a story of family relationships, of the past, and of a historical setting during the Cold War which may give the sister’s insight into the life of their mother.

220px-Mists_of_Avalon-1st_edThe Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley – While not primarily set in winter, fantasy fiction fans will devour this novel.  When you crack open the hefty pages of The Mists of Avalon, you will be transported into the world of the legend of King Arthur, but told from the perspective of Arthur’s sister Morgana Le Fey (Morgaine in the novel).  Something about the chilly months just makes it the perfect time to visit a mythical world.

In a Dark, Dark Wood by Ruth Ware –  You may have recently read The Woman in Cabin 10, but have you read Ware’s earlier novel in a Dark, Dark Wood? Claire hasn’t spoken to her one friend in years.  So it’s surprising when she gets an invitation for a weekend away at an old friend’s house in the woods.  For some reason, Claire decides to go and wakes up 48 hours later in a hospital bed knowing that someone is dark dark wooddead. Here’s some advice: If someone you haven’t spoken to in years asks you to go in the woods, you probably shouldn’t.  What you should do is stop by the library and pick up this read.

So stop on by the library and pick up one of these reads to cozy up with, and don’t forget to let us know what you’re reading this winter!

 

-Jessica Bielen, Adult Services Librarian