Highlights of the Week: Little Bookworms, Raw Food Workshop, & More!

4/11 | Little Bookworms: Grades K-1

Breath in…hold…breath out. Miss Gina shared stories about mindfulness in this week’s Little Bookworms Elementary Enrichment class. Gina shared the enchanting story, Anh’s Anger by Gail Silver and the inspiring tale, What Do You Do With An Idea by Kobi Yamada.  

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To help children relax and calm their minds, Gina taught the children how to make “Mindful Jars.”  She used recycled water bottles, clear glue, water, food coloring, and some glitter to create beautiful jars for the children to use to help them relax before bedtime, or whenever they need to take a mindful minute.

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4/12 | Raw Food Workshop

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With the assistance of raw food nutrition author, coach and chef Karen Ranzi, M.A, thirty-five eager attendees learned how they could incorporate the raw foods lifestyle into their routines and eat their way to healthier, energetic, and more vibrant selves.

Karen Ranzi is an award winning author, internationally renowned speaker, raw food coach, certified raw food chef, speech and feeding therapist, and the creator of SuperHealthyChildren.com and the NJ Raw Food Support Network. She became a passionate advocate for the raw food lifestyle when she saw that a plant based diet helped heal her family members from life threatening-illnesses.

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During the workshop, Karen spoke about the general poor health that afflicts our families, including problems caused by processed and refined foods (with the consumption of acrylamide ), as well as nutrient loss. Karen explained that a whole plant nutrition is beneficial due to healthy protein sources, drinking more water, and fiber-rich foods that are dense in various nutrients and minerals. According to Karen, fresh, unprocessed fruits and vegetables offer many health advantages such as increased energy, stamina, resistance to illness, increased attention span, improved digestion, better sleep patterns, preventing diseases, feeling younger, and more.


 

4/14 | Cell Phone Photography Workshop

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10 Rules of Photography: Rule of Thirds, Framing, Symmetry & Patterns, Balancing Elements, Cropping, Depth, Background, Leading Lines, View Point, and Experimentation

The two hour session led by Heidi Sussman, an exhibiting photographer, instructor and mixed media artist who combines natural and digital media with her images, began with a slide presentation covering the cell phone as a photographic tool. 

Discussing the elements that constitute a strong photo, Heidi explained that “Your cell phone is just another tool to create photos; you need to understand the rules of photography to create good images.” To help with this process, she went over the basic elements of a good photo, such as lighting, composition, contrast, and a focal point.

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Heidi shared some important guidelines for taking better cell phone pics including keeping its simple, showing depth, shooting from a low or high angle, aligning subjects on a diagonal, and capturing close up detail. The second half of the workshop covered apps that can be use for the photo editing process to enhance images, or for creative and artistic results. Utilizing one of her favorite apps, Heidi ended with a hands-on session with the app Snapseed.

 


 

4/17 | Get Lit Adult Book Club

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“What’s the first thing you think of when you hear the word “mud?””

That’s how Librarian Karen deWilde kicked off our compelling Get Lit book discussion of Hillary Jordan’s Bellwether Prize winning debut novel, Mudbound.

If this sounds like a book club you’d enjoy, pick up a copy of next month’s book, Surprise Me by Sophie Kinsella, register for our May 15th meeting, and join us!

 


 

4/18 | Little Bookworms: Grades K-1

Giggles from the full class were heard coming from the Program Room as Librarian Gina Vaccaro read some of her favorite silly stories, such as Monster Mess by Margery Cuyler, the fun modern twist of the classic fairy tale, Falling for Rapunzel by Leah Wilcox, Monster Needs One More by Natalie Marshall. and The Good For Nothing Button by Charise Mericile Harper (an Elephant & Piggie-like reading book).

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Organic Granny Smith apples, organic sunflower seed butter, and sunflower seeds were used to create silly edible creepy creatures.  Teen volunteers washed and cut the apples while Gina was reading, then the children used their imaginations to put their creepy creatures together. Various candies attached with the sunflower seed butter helped decorate and give the creatures some character.  The children enjoyed eating their masterpieces and parents were happy it was (mostly) healthy.

 


 

4/18 | Senior Happening: The Stephen Fuller Quartet

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Over 120 attendees were treated to an afternoon of entertainment when the talented Stephan Fuller Quartet performed crowd favorites, such as Love is Here to Stay and Send In The Clowns. Composed of Nick Scheuble on drums (Rockaway, NJ), Belden Bullock on bass guitar, and Tomoko Ohno on piano, the quartet was a hit, with people remarking how wonderfully talented they all were. One woman reminisced with tears in her eyes as the band played Stardust, explaining that it had been her wedding song many years ago.

Enjoy a short clip from the performance, as the quartet plays their version of  Frank Sinatra’s Fly Me To The Moon

 

***Senior Happening is made possible in part by Funds from the NJ State Council of the Arts/Department of State, a Partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, and administered by the Essex County Division of Cultural and Historic Affairs.

4/22 | DIY Earth Day Terrariums

Teens had a wonderful time making terrariums with recycled jars, living plants, and cute animal figures. It was a beautiful spring day, so Teen librarian, Karen Dewilde, took the group outside to gather suitable plants. Karen used her knowledge of gardening to talk about the precautions necessary when gathering plants from nature. Each participant chose their plants and added layers to the terrarium to create a unique little world.

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Highlights of the Week: Sleeping Better Naturally, Senior Happening, and St. Patrick’s Day Celebrations

3/15 | Sleeping Better, Naturally

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The third in our series of community health lectures in collaboration with the Summit Medical Group, Dr. Mairanna Shimelfarb, MD, who specializes in Integrative Family Medicine, addressed the epidemic of sleeplessness and enlightened the audience about natural ways to get sound, restorative sleep.

Her talk, which was coincidentally held on the eve of World Sleep Day, discussed why you need to sleep, why you cant get good sleep, why it’s important to do something about it, and how to do it naturally!

Dr. Shimelfarb spoke about the stages of sleep, different types of insomnia, causes of sleep trouble, and the different factors that can help contribute to a good night’s sleep, including a healthy diet, and reducing mind noise (disconnecting from electronic devices).
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Along with other ways to relax, Dr. Shimelfarb did a video demonstration of two effective relaxation methods , including a 4:7:8 breathing exercise pioneered by Dr Andrew Weill, and an introduction to the Pranayama breathing technique as shown by Yogi Nora.
Dr. Shimelfarb’s presentation, Sleep Better, Naturally, can be viewed in it’s entirety.

 


 

3/16 | Senior Happening: The Great Lady Songwriters

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Fred Miller performed one of his lectures-in-song, “Great Lady Songwriters,” in honor of Women’s History Month. Guests also got in the spirit of wearing green for St. Patrick’s Day.

Miller explained that many women, including four of the most notable ( Dorothy Fields, Kay Swift, Dana Suesse and Ann Ronnell), were prolific composers and lyricists. Though they never gained as much notoriety as the Gershwin brothers or Irving Berlin, their work was the core of Tin Pan Alley.

As the 1920s brought many changes in American culture, music moved ahead with inventions like the phonograph, radio, and sound movies. Jazz also transformed the music industry. New York City, with its concentration of theaters and publishing houses, became the center of the music world and at the center of the city was a small area called Tin Pan Alley. The musicians of Tin Pan Alley blended ragtime, jazz, and ballads to create a new brand of song that was witty and sophisticated. Fields, who was born in Allenhurst, NJ, brought us “The Way You Look Tonight”, “On the Sunny Side of the Street”, and “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love” — just a few of more than 400 songs she wrote for Broadway musicals and films.

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Carolyn Leigh teamed with Cy Coleman and other songwriters to write songs for Mary Martin in Peter Pan, including “I’m Flying” and “I Won’t Grow Up.” Frank Sinatra and Tony Bennett also sang Leigh tunes, such as “Witchcraft,” “Young at Heart,” and “The Best is Yet to Come.” Leigh also wrote “Hey Look Me Over,” for Lucille Ball in Wildcat.

Miller ended the program with another prolific female songwriter, Peggy Lee. Lee may be better known for her smooth and smoky voice, her career as singer, songwriter, composer, and actress spanned six decades. After leaving the Benny Goodman Orchestra, Lee teamed with her husband to write songs in the 1950s, then worked on her own. She wrote for Disney Studios, and sang some of her own songs in Lady and the Tramp. 

Senior Happening is funded by Friends of the Library with a grant awarded by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, administered by the Essex County Department of Cultural and Historic Affairs.

 


 

3/20 | The Shannachie of Glendunbun Ballybeg

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Even though it was sleeting, about thirty people attended the program, including one couple who drove all the down from Sussex County.

 

 

 

 

Highlights of the Week: Library Mini Golf Fundraiser, Chinese Culture Day & More!

2/16 | Senior Happening

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“At Long Last Love” was the theme of a post-Valentine’s Day Senior Happening at the Library. Over 100 seniors enjoyed a program of appropriate love songs from the Great American Songbook, sung by Soprano Jean McClelland, accompanied by her husband, pianist Bill McClelland.
Many of the songs were familiar from the Broadway musicals BrigadoonGuys and Dolls, and Showboat. Others were from composers like Cole Porter, George and Ira Gershwin, Alan Jay Lerner, or Irving Berlin. Berlin, known as Mr. Tin Pan Alley, wrote over 1,500 songs between 1907 and the 1960s. “Blue Skies” and “How Deep is the Ocean” were two of his songs that Jean sang.
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Other selections for the afternoon’s program included “Can’t Help Lovin’ Dat Man” and “Summertime” from Showboat, “Fascinatin’ Rhythm,” “S Wonderful,” “Wouldn’t It be Lovely,” and “In the Still of the Night.”

2/20 & 2/22 |Coffee and Crime
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This week’s discussion was on the book Time’s Up by Janey Mack, a light, frothy mystery about a young woman from a cop family who becomes a meter maid to prove she’s tough enough to join the police force.
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There were twenty five attendees in total and the two groups had surprisingly different reactions to the book: the night owls enjoyed the book’s slapstick humor, broadly drawn characters, and steamy romance (perfect for Valentine’s Day!). The early birds were critical of the book’s stereotypes, which did seem dated since its publication two years earlier before #MeToo and other social movements had taken off.
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Our librarian, Ariel Zeitlin, who leads the group, played a clip from the children’s movie Zootopia, which has a strikingly similar plot to the book. And longtime member Helen Farber brought her own delicious homemade cookie bars to the evening meeting, which were devoured by all.

2/22 |Library Mini Golf Fundraiser
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The Livingston Community came together for an evening of fun and fundraising at LPL’s first mini golf event. Cheers and laughter could be heard throughout the children’s department as players aimed for the illusive hole-in-one on a whimsical golf course created entirely by volunteers. The groups who volunteered were the Weeblos Troop 12, Livingston High School Twin Club, Emerald Knights Robotics, Italian Club, National Art Honor Society, and the Livingston Library Teen Advisory Board.  All Proceeds Benefited  Friends of the Livingston Library and the ALA disaster Relief Fund.
Check out this cute video from the program.

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2/24 |Chinese Culture Day at LHS
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The Livingston Library booth for Chinese Culture Day at the Livingston High School drew a large crowd. Kids who attended loved our free toys, the free Chinese magazines we gave out were very popular as well. Over one hundred bags of toys, eighty Chinese magazines, and dozens of pens were given out.

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2/20, 2/26 & 2/27 | Little Listeners

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During the winter session of Little Listeners, children ages two to five years old and their caregivers, reinforced their knowledge of basic concepts while enjoying stories, songs, and books.  When Amanda read stories about winter, the children loved practicing shape names as they participated in the flannel board story “Where is the Snowball?”. The children learned about the value of sharing and problem-solving in Lost, a book about a bear who loses his mitten. The children also practiced counting and colors in the flannel board story “Ten Rabbits”, in which rabbits gather ingredients to make vegetable soup.

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Amanda shared songs related to the different storytime themes and the kids enjoyed a special visit from Guitar Joe who sung Jewel’s “That’s What I’d Do.”  

 

 


 

2/26 | Teen Crafters

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Teens attending the Library’s annual Teen Crafters Program learned to crochet and/or knit. Over the course of the six-week program, the crafters practiced basic skills while making a small project such as a scarf, bracelet, or mini hat. Once the projects are complete the teens will choose to keep their creation or to donate them to a local charity such as Emily’s Hats for Hope or Woman’s Heart Scarves program.

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2/27 | X-treme Readers

The group read one of Gina’s favorite books of  recent years, the National Book Award winner and 2015 Newbery Honor Book, Brown Girl Dreaming written by the National Ambassador to Young People’s Literature for 2018, Jacqueline Woodson. The children commented how they loved her poetic use of language and how descriptive the author was in her storytelling– these are some of the same reasons Gina loved the book so much. The readers shared stories of their family history, the story of their names, discussed the Civil Rights Movement, and figured out their “thing,” a.k.a the one thing  they do well.

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X-Treme Readers proudly display their name art.

The readers then created word art of their names, using calligraphy and bubble letter templates to simulate ‘graffiti,’ (the author was caught by her uncle as she tried to spray paint her tag.)  As the children were writing, Gina played YouTube interviews of Jacqueline Woodson on the Chromebook for the children to listen to.  One of the girls took it to the next level by including #xtreme in her ‘tag.’

Finally, the group (and some of their parents) enjoyed the last few minutes of the Livingston Listens Lecture, Understanding Your Child’s Racial Identity.  


 

2/28 |Children’s Chess

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Chess classes this winter were led by LHS Chess Club member Varun Maheshwari with assistance from other members of the chess club.  Having the class led by a teen volunteer provided a wonderful opportunity for the children to interact with members of the LHS Chess Club, a group which the children chess players will one day have a chance to participate in.  

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The well-attended chess class for children in grade 2 to grade 5 included experienced chess players as well as players learning chess for the first time.  Children reviewed chess basics and chess strategy by listening and answering questions during lessons led by Varun using a demonstration chessboard.  Varun and the teen volunteers also challenged the children with chess puzzles that the children solved using the class chess sets and chessboards (purchased by the Friends of the Livingston Library).  

 

 

 

Highlights of the Week: Livingston Listens Lecture, Collage Workshop, Book Clubs and More!

1/16 |  Healing Hands Collage Workshop

Artist and art instructor Mansa Mussa led a group of fifteen adults in a colorful and fun “Healing Hands” collage workshop in which they learned to create vibrant 8×10 inch collages using a variety of wallpaper samples and traced images of their hands.

For the collages, Mansa instructed the participants to use techniques found in  collage painter, Romare Bearden’s, works: these techniques included adding various cut geometric pieces, colorful hearts, flowers, word stickers, and various textures and layers to create a dynamic composition.  Calling collage the “most democratic” art form, Mansa urged the attendees to create a narrative through their collages and to “break at least one rule” in the process.
A couple of participants took up the option of using digital pictures in their collage –Mansa took a picture from their phone and used a photo printer to make a copy– which made the collages more “personalized.” Students walked away with beautiful, unique collages and expressed how much they not only enjoyed the program, but that they would like to have Mansa come back.

 


1/16 |  Get Lit Adult Book Club

This week’s group read The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. In this chilling, dystopian narrative, women have lost all of their rights and must live under the extreme religious society’s patriarchal rule.  In the fictional world of Gilead, it is illegal for women to work, have money and read.  The women are also expected to eat what they are given and do whatever they are told, or pay dire consequences.  As expected, our lively group had a lot to say about this!

Group members were interested to learn that Margaret Atwood was quoted to say that she had “invented nothing” in Gilead.  All of the extreme acts of violence and oppression against women were indeed happening in parts of the world when she wrote the book in the 1980’s.  The group was also fascinated to learn that the popular quote from the book, “Nolite te Bastardes Carborundorum,” a phrase that has been loosely translated to mean “Don’t let the bastards grind you down,” is actually a joke from Atwood’s Latin classes!

Now that they have read the book, the group is excited to watch the highly acclaimed award winning series.

 


1/23 |  Understanding Race in America with Dr. Khyati Joshi

Dr. Khyati Joshi presented a historical narrative that helped to provide and understanding of how Supreme Court decisions and immigration laws have contributed to our society as we know it today.  Dr. Joshi entertained questions and comments from the audience regarding these issues.

This program was the first lecture of the Livingston Public Library’s Livingston Listens Series: A Series of Programs on Inclusion, Representation, and Social Justice.  Livingston Listens is generously sponsored by the Friends of the Livingston Library.

We look forward to welcoming Dr. Joshi back on Tuesday, February 27th for the second lecture in our series, Understanding Your Child’s Racial Identity.


1/23 & 1/25 |  Coffee and Crime

Our first set of Coffee & Crime Mystery Book Club meetings for 2018 started off with a bang.  Thirty-one members in total (nineteen in the daytime and twelve in the evening) came to the local history room to talk about Keigo Higashino’s literary thriller, Malice. Reference librarian Ariel Zeitlin, the group’s facilitator, served dry roasted edamame to go with the Japanese setting, but they were eclipsed at the evening meeting by member Nancy Pearl’s amazing home-baked chocolate chip cookies.

Because of the novel’s “unreliable narrator,” the group listened to an audio clip about how to construct the perfect lie. A few members resented the author’s skillful manipulation of the reader, while others were spellbound by his mastery, but as usual, everyone had a great discussion.

 


1/25  |  “Nutty by Nature” Improv Comedy Troupe

Sponsored by the Friends of the LibraryThink Theater” series, eleven actors arrived to perform hilarious improv skits for a crowd of fifty-two people, including three children.

While Livingston resident and professional actor Robert Sapoff is the founder of the troupe, it was Elaine Brodie of Caldwell that led the show.  The other actors joining them were Michael J. Foy, Christina Mastroeni, Alex Bernstein, Tarek Salib and Charles (Chuck) Tsocanos of Bloomfield, Ray Brandess, Bruce Mejia, Tiffany Bizub, Nat Gennace, and Doug Pinkowsky.

In one of the skits, a “husband and wife” were pantomiming barbecuing a steak on a grill and were told to do it in various emotional states, such as anger, depression, love, etc. The audience couldn’t stop laughing when the fuming wife slathered BBQ sauce over the steak while the furious husband shouted out that she very well knew he only liked salt and pepper and the “argument” escalated. It was so funny to see how quickly they could jump from one emotion to another and had the audience in stitches.

In another skit, they asked the public to call out names of various professions and two actors had to perform how those occupations would work together. When the actors chose how a leprechaun (not actually a profession, but let’s pretend it is) was paired off with an astronaut in an office on the moon, some people were left in literal tears from laughing so hard. All in all, it was a wonderfully entertaining evening in which winter doldrums were set aside and good times were had by all.

Highlights of the Week: Cookbook Club, Adult Paint Night, A Carole King Tribute & More!



11/12 | ONE FINE TAPESTRY: A CAROLE KING TRIBUTE

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You could feel the electricity in the air as the husband and wife duo, Diane and Gerard Barros,  performed One Fine Tapestry: A Carole King Tribute to a full house!

Gerard and Diane performed many of the hits off of Tapestry, Carole’s second album, which has sold over twenty five million copies and remains popularly downloaded today. Sing-along classics like Feel the Earth Move, So Far Away, It’s Too Late, Beautiful, You’ve Got a Friend, Where you Lead, and Natural Woman lit up the room as the audience danced and sang along.  The fun music drifted out of the Program Room into the Library which attracted many visiting families to join in.

During the program, the musicians provided interesting bits of history on Carole’s life, such as when Carole’s demo tape of Bobby Vee’s Take Good Care of My Baby was accidentally played on the radio and later became a huge hit. Other stories revolved around Carole writing many songs together with her husband, Gerry Goffin, which were recorded by big names such as The Drifters, The Shirelles (Will You Love Me Tomorrow), The Chiffons (One Fine Day), Aretha Franklin (Natural Woman), James Taylor (You’ve Got a Friend), The Beatles, Michael Jackson, The Everly Brothers, Herman’s Hermits, Linda Ronstadt, The Bee Gees, and The Monkees.  Pleasant Valley Sunday was actually written by Carole and Gerry when they lived in West Orange, NJ.

Thank you so much for organizing this!” “They were wonderful!” “Fantastic!” “That was so much fun!” “I’m happy I came out in the cold for this today!” These are just a few of the comments made to our librarians as the crowd exited the Program Room.

It’s not “too late” to see a video from our show!

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11/13 | COOKBOOK CLUB

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This meeting’s dishes came from the book Mark Bittman’s Kitchen Matrix. Club members who attended chose a recipe they enjoyed from the book and brought their finished dish to the club, setting out each one for everyone to taste.
While eating, the club members discussed how they felt about the recipes in the book, most of them expressing that they enjoyed them, but others felt that the recipes were lacking, choosing to tweak the recipes to their liking. The biggest complaint about the book was that there were almost too many choices and that there were little to no measurements of ingredients. Another complaint was that there were recipes that either didn’t mention adding salt and/or pepper for taste. Even with some downsides encountered in the book, there were many delicious dishes found on the menu for the night!

 

Menu:

  • Lentil Salad
  • Curried Cauliflower Soup
  • Brussels Sprouts Slaw with Peanuts
  • Pommes Anna
  • Classic Deviled Eggs
  • Egg Salad with Dill Pickles
  • Roasted Sweet Potato Salad with Black Beans and Chile Dressing
  • Pasta, Beans, and Tomatos
  • Crisp Quinoa Cakes with Almonds, Rosemary, and Dijon
  • Chechin-Thigh Kabobs
  • Persian Salad
  • Basic Dough that was also used to make Pecan Pie Squares
  • Knafeh a La Creme
  • Cream Puff Pastries
The next meeting is on January 17th at 7 PM and the book will be Cook This Now: 120 Easy and Delectable Dishes You Can’t Wait to Make by Melissa Clark. If you’re interested in joining the next meeting, pick up a copy of this cookbook at the Circulation Desk!


11/14 & 11/16 | COFFEE & CRIME MYSTERY BOOK CLUB

Our long-running Coffee & Crime Mystery Book Club meets twice a month, on Tuesday at 12:30 PM, and on Thursday at 7:15 PM, to accommodate all of Livingston’s mystery lovers.  This week a total of 27 members turned out to discuss The Indian Bride by Karin Fossum, about a Norwegian bachelor who makes an unlikely love-match on a short trip to India only to have his new wife disappear on her way to his small town in Norway. The ambiguous ending had both groups buzzing (some indignantly) over a snack of Jarlsberg cheese and flatbread crackers chosen in honor of the setting.  Ariel Zeitlin, one of our reference librarians and the book club’s facilitator, also showed clips from a BBC documentary, Time Shift: Nordic Noir, including an interview with Karin Fossum about her personal experiences with murder.
This week Ariel also unveiled her brand new line-up of  Coffee & Crime selections and meeting dates for 2018, as well as a list of all the books the group has read since 2012.

 

11/15 | JR. JOURNALISTS

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Children grades 3-5 learned all about what it takes to be a reporter in Livingston Library’s four-week enrichment course, “Jr. Journalists.”

In week one, Anna read the group three versions of The Three Little Pigs and led a discussion on the 5Ws+1H (Who, What, Where, Why, When, and How), Fact vs. Opinion, Subjectivity vs. Objectivity, and Reliable vs. Unreliable Narrators, to decide which of the three versions was the REAL Three Little Pigs story. After a debate, the majority of the group voted that Jon Scieszka’s The True Story of the Three Little Pigs was the most true version of the story.

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During weeks two and three of Jr. Journalists, Anna assigned groups a fairy tale to research and decide which of the six books was the most true version. Each group used critical thinking skills to determine which books they found to be biased or had unreliable narrators, and which book they found to be most objective and true.

During the fourth and final week, all four groups presented their articles to the class while their parents attended.

 


 

11/15 | ADULT PAINT NIGHT

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Over twenty-five participants had a fun, engaging time recreating vibrant colored hearts in the signature style of American pop artist, Jim Dine, using small canvases, acrylic paints, and a variety of brushes.
Brandon Dorney of Art Kids Academy gave a quick demonstration of Dine’s style and then let the participants follow their own hearts to come up with very unique depictions of the “heart” theme; one participant even painted a broken heart.
To quote some of the attendees, this program was “great fun,” and ” a creative time away from the TV and computer at home.”
Participants included three retired Livingston teachers who seemed to love every minute of it!

11/16 | MARTY SCHNEIT TALK: “NEW YORK CITY DURING WORLD WAR II”
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Historian Marty Schneit gave an entertaining and engaging talk on New York City During World War II to a full house of ninety-two attendees.

Utilizing pictures and slides in conjunction with his discussions, Marty talked about many interesting things such as the important role of women in the war: Women were encouraged to donate their nylon stockings to be re-spun for parachutes, and the iconic image of Rosie the Riveter developed from women working in “men’s labor,” such as welding.  There was even a program called W.A.V.E.S., or Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service, that was started up by the Navy.  Other interesting facts included the Mafia where the State of New York and the Navy struck a deal to let out “Lucky” Luciano from prison so that the Mafia could provide intelligence to the Navy.  That’s definitely not something you learn in history class!

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This wonderful program attracted many people that were either children during this time, served in the war themselves, or had family members that lived during it.  Marty made the talk as interactive as he could, maintaining an ongoing Q&A as people shared their stories and experiences on topics such as food rations, black outs, covering up windows, and meatless Tuesdays.  It was a trip down memory lane for the attendees that lived during the time, many of them reminiscing with each other.

This program was funded by the Friends of the Livingston Library.


 

 

 

 

 

Highlights of the Week: BookFEST!, Trick or Treat, Nature Heals Workshop, and More!

10/26-29: BOOKFEST 

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Run by the Friends of the Library, BookFEST! is our biggest sale of the year. Just like last year, crowds filled the room each day of the event.  The program room was arranged with tables full of books, puzzles, toys, video games, dvds, art, and other miscellaneous items.  BookFEST! may be centered around books, but there was definitely something for everyone!

Although it was raining, our most popular day was Bag Day on Sunday: customers could buy a Friends bag, fill it up with books instead of purchasing the individual items.  Talk about a good deal!

Proceeds from the sale support great library programs for children and adults all year long.



10/30: CODERGALS 

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An exceptional program led by LHS female coder volunteers, Codergals started on October 16th, and continues on until November 6th. In this program, girls in grades 3-5 learn new coding techniques each week, such as creating their own emojis, opening their own blogs using WIX, exploring objects & variables in coding with the dancing Yeti project, and this most recent week, in the spirit of Halloween, the group practiced their coding skills with a zombie game.  They also began learning about app coding using the bitsbox system.

On the last day of the class, they will present their completed blogs containing all of their work.  With the technical field expanding and growing every year, this is a fun opportunity for girls to learn about some of the latest programs, apps, and pages used for coding.



10/31: TRICK OR TREAT AT THE LIBRARY

If you were looking for a fun place to visit on Halloween, the library was it. Our librarians dressed up for the occasion, many donning traditional witch hats to celebrate the day.  Hundreds of kids showed up in costume, said the magic words– “trick or treat”– and received candy either at the circulation or the children’s desk.  Kids with allergies and food restrictions were given non-sweet treats.  Make sure to keep the library in mind when planning your Halloween adventures next year!



11/1: NATURE HEALS WORKSHOP: SEASONAL EATING AND HERBS FOR IMMUNE SUPPORT 

 

 

Run by herbal specialist Jenna Henry Hansen and yoga instructor/nutritional therapist Jenn Dorney, this incredibly informative workshop focused on the ideas of ancient eating, specifically the practices of Ayurveda and Chinese medicine.  Jenna and Jenn went over specific grocery items to purchase based on the season, including sample recipes for everyone to take home with them and sample foods and drinks to try at the event itself.  There were also many packets handed out with information on the properties of many foods and herbs with information on how they help strengthen the immune system.

Here is an immune boosting recipe from last night’s program that you may find useful as we head into the colder months.  Be sure to let us know if you try it out!

ZESTY IMMUNE-BOOST ELDERBERRY SYRUP

Take 1 tsp 3-4x daily at the first sign of a cold.

INGREDIENTS:
1 Cup fresh or 1/2 Cup dried elderberries
1/4 Cup rose hips
1 Cinnamon stick or 1 tsp ground cinnamon
2-3 Whole cloves
Zest of one orange
3 Cups water
1 Cup organic raw honey

INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Place the berries, rose hips, cinnamon, orange zest, clove and water in a saucepan and bring to a boil.
2. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 30-45 minutes.
3. Remove from heat and mash up the mixture.
4. Strain the mixture though a cheesecloth or strainer, making sure to squeeze out all the goodness from the herbs.
5. Stir in honey. Add more or less to taste.
6. Bottle the syrup and store in the refrigerator for up to 3 months.



11/2: TEEN ADVISORY BOARD

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Did you think that those awesome teen programs happen by themselves?  Of course not! That’s why we’re giving you an inside look into a planning meeting of the Teen Advisory Board.  They are working to finalize the plans for Night at the Library: National Treasure.  The group tested the puzzles, worked on the clues and ensured that the event will be fun for all!



11/2: MARTY SCHNEIT LECTURE – THE BORSCHT BELT

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Historian Martin Schneit lectured to a packed house about the Borscht Belt, the  nickname for the summer resorts that existed in the Catskill Mountains in parts of Sullivan, Orange and Ulster counties in New York.  He displayed many colorful slides of Grossinger’s Hotel, with its grand dining room and indoor swimming pool.  Marty shared stories from his time as a busboy at Grossinger’s;  displaying a photo of Bess Myerson,  the 1st Jewish “Miss America,” being crowned in 1945, sitting at one of the tables.  He dazzled the crowd with interesting facts, such as basketball player Wilt Chamberlain worked as a bellhop at Kutsher’s Hotel.  The crowd enjoyed musical clips of Eddie Fisher singing “Sunrise, Sunset,” and of Jimmy Durante singing “Make Someone Happy.”  Marty had the audience heartily laughing along to jokes originally told by Rodney Dangerfield and George Burns.

This fantastic trip down memory lane was made possible by the Friends of the Livingston Public Library.

Don’t miss Marty Schneit’s next lecture on November 16th, about New York City During World War II, also sponsored by the Friends.


11/3: ONLINE BUSINESS & NJ TAX

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Representatives from the New Jersey Division of Taxation, as part of the Taxation University Series, in cooperation with the New Jersey State Library presented Online Business & New Jersey Tax to small business owners.
They explained the NJ Sales and Use Tax, how to properly report and pay taxes, helpful publications and useful contact information.  Participants were able to ask questions and both representatives provided useful information.

This is the first in the It’s Your Business Series of business and personal finance programs. Registration is open for the next program in the series, Fundamentals of New Jersey Sales Tax.