Poetry Reads to Wrap Up the New Year

Looking to read a few more books before the end of 2021? These poetry collections are perfect to add to your end of the year reading!

New Names For Lost Things by Noor Unnahar (read on Hoopla)

From the Publisher: An all-new illustrated poetry collection from the bestselling author of yesterday i was the moon, New Names for Lost Things combines Noor Unnahar’s powerful poetic voice and her signature collage-style visual art for a book of highly personal reflections on loss, inheritance, and what is left behind on the nonlinear path to becoming who you are meant to be.

Call Us What We Carry by Amanda Gorman (read on Libby

From the Publisher: Formerly titled The Hill We Climb and Other Poems, the luminous poetry collection by #1 New York Times bestselling author and presidential inaugural poet Amanda Gorman captures a shipwrecked moment in time and transforms it into a lyric of hope and healing. In Call Us What We Carry, Gorman explores history, language, identity, and erasure through an imaginative and intimate collage. Harnessing the collective grief of a global pandemic, this beautifully designed volume features poems in many inventive styles and structures and shines a light on a moment of reckoning. Call Us What We Carry reveals that Gorman has become our messenger from the past, our voice for the future.

The Gravity Inside Us by Chole Frayne (read on Hoopla

From the Publisher: Gathering inspiration from a life of travel, hope, long-distance relationships, healing, and adventure, Frayne invites readers into her world. The Gravity Inside Us is an ode to whatever it is we carry that pulls us in and out of place, and speaks so insistently of fate. Through writing about her own experiences, this book is a reach into that space. 

Clarity and Connection by Yung Pubelo (read on Hoopla

From the Publisher: In Clarity & Connection, Yung Pueblo describes how intense emotions accumulate in our subconscious and condition us to act and react in certain ways. In his characteristically spare, poetic style, he guides readers through the excavation and release of the past that is required for growth.

Winter Roses After Fall by R.H. Sin (read on Hoopla

From the Publisher: There’s a harshness in the air; the season is changing its colors. The rain is chilled, icy to the touch, and the sky, filled with melancholy. Your search for warmth has brought you here; you starve for something profound. You require something that will resonate with your soul. Despite how cold, you’re determined to grow. And with these words, you bloom, a winter rose.

Happy Reading!

-Jessica, Interim Head of Adult Services & Acquisitions

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