Restoring Our Planet: Reads for Earth Day 2021

Earth Day, celebrated every April, is prime time to plant a garden, enjoy the lovely scent of fresh air and fragrant blossoms, clean up some litter, and, you guessed it, dig into a book that celebrates the importance of the environment and our responsibility towards safeguarding it.

Here are some recently added books that will help you think about the marvelous planet that you inhabit, the horrendous challenges faced by it and the part you can play in conserving and restoring natural resources, and ensuring their sustainability for future generations.

Attainable Sustainable: The Lost Art of Self-Reliant Living by Kris Bordessa

Based on the blog of the same name, this book shows readers how to live a simpler, more self-reliant life. It includes instructions not only for growing and cooking food but also for creating artisanal items for the home as well as navigating the great outdoors.

The (Almost) Zero Waste Guide: 100 Tips for Reducing Your Waste Without Changing Your Life by Melanie Mannarino

A practical guide on how to go “almost zero waste,” featuring 100 tips on how to reduce waste in your everyday life, at home, and in your community.

Disposable City : Miami’s Future On the Shores of Climate Catastrophe by Mario Alejandro Ariza

Miami, Florida, is likely to be entirely underwater by the end of this century. Residents are already starting to see the effects of sea level rise today. From sunny day flooding caused by higher tides to a sewer system on the brink of total collapse, the city undeniably lives in a climate changed world. Ariza shows us not only what climate change looks like on the ground today, but also what Miami will look like 100 years from now. Miami may be on the front lines of climate change, but the battle it’s fighting today is coming for the rest of the U.S.–and the rest of the world–far sooner than we could have imagined even a decade ago.

Every Day is Earth Day: Simple Ways To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint by Harriet Dyer

Full of simple, achievable ways to help you reduce your carbon footprint and make environmentally-friendly choices–from tips on creating a more sustainable home to reducing your plastic use and shopping responsibly.

The Future Earth: A Radical Vision For What’s Possible in the Age of Warming by Eric Holthaus

Hopeful and prophetic, this book invites us to imagine how we can reverse the effects of climate change in our own lifetime and encourages us to enter into a deeper relationship with the earth as conscientious stewards and to reaffirm our commitment to one another in our shared humanity.

How Are We Going to Explain This?: Our Future On a Hot Earth by Jelmer Mommers

Draws on up-to-date science to outline specific steps that must be taken individually and collectively to mitigate, prevent and reverse catastrophic environmental damage.

How to Avoid a Climate Disaster: The Solutions We Have and the Breakthroughs We Need by Bill Gates

Gates explains why he cares so deeply about climate change and what makes him optimistic that the world can avoid the most dire effects of the climate crisis. By investing in research, inventing new technologies, and by deploying them quickly at large scale, Gates believes climate change can be addressed in meaningful ways.

How To Give Up Plastic: A Guide to Changing the World, One Plastic Bottle At a Time by Will McCallum

An accessible guide to the changes we can all make–small and large–to rid our lives of disposable plastic and clean up the world’s oceans.

More Plants Less Waste: Plant-Based Recipes + Zero Waste Life Hacks With Purpose by Max La Manna

Manna, zero waste chef and sustainability advocate, bridges the gap between vegan food and waste-free cooking – inviting us to channel the More Plants Less Waste mindset and discover a stronger purpose in our daily routines. Max has inspired thousands of people across the world to rethink their approach to consumption and made it his mission to turn the tide on plastic and breathe new energy into the leftovers that are typically destined for the bin. 

The New Climate War: The Fight To Take Back Our Planet by Michael E. Mann

A renowned climate scientist shows how fossil fuel companies have waged a thirty-year campaign to deflect blame and responsibility and delay action on climate change, and offers a battle plan for how we can save the planet.

Our House Is On Fire: Scenes Of a Family and a Planet in Crisis by Malena Ernman

When climate activist Greta Thunberg was eleven, her parents Malena and Svante, and her little sister Beata, were facing a crisis in their own home. Greta had stopped eating and speaking, and her mother and father had reconfigured their lives to care for her. Desperate and searching for answers, her parents discovered what was at the heart of Greta’s distress: her imperiled future on a rapidly heating planet.  Steered by Greta’s determination to understand the truth and generate change, they began to see the deep connections between their own suffering and the planet’s. Written by a remarkable family and told through the voice of an iconoclastic mother, this is the story of how they fought their problems at home by taking global action. 

Superman’s Not Coming: Our National Water Crisis and What We the People Can Do About It by Erin Brockovich

Brockovich warns that America’s water crisis isn’t looming on the horizon–it’s already here. The book makes clear that the most precious resource on planet Earth is alarmingly polluted by toxins, hazardous waste, lead, fracking chemicals, and more. She lays out the facts, and gives us the tools to take steps–large and small–to make changes in our own counties, cities and towns, and help to preserve our selves, our water, our planet.

The 2084 Report: An Oral History Of The Great Warming by  James Lawrence Powell

This vivid, terrifying, and galvanizing novel reveals our future world after previous generations failed to halt climate change. In short chapters about topics like sea level rise, drought, migration, war, and more, the book brings global warming to life, revealing a new reality in which Rotterdam doesn’t exist, Phoenix has no electricity, and Canada is part of the United States. From wars over limited resources to the en masse migrations of entire countries and the rising suicide rate, the characters describe other issues they are confronting in the world they share with the next two generations. 

Under a White Sky: The Nature of The Future by Elizabeth Kolbert

After doing so much damage, can we change nature, this time to save it?  Kolbert examines how the very sorts of interventions that have imperiled our planet are increasingly seen as the only hope for its salvation. She meets scientists who are trying to preserve the world’s rarest fish, which lives in a single, tiny pool in the middle of the Mojave. She visits a lava field in Iceland, where engineers are turning carbon emissions to stone; an aquarium in Australia, where researchers are trying to develop “super coral” that can survive on a hotter globe; and a lab at Harvard, where physicists are contemplating shooting tiny diamonds into the stratosphere in order to reflect sunlight back to space and cool the earth.

Form films and documentaries on the environment and related topics, check out our streaming service Kanopy 

-Archana, Adult Services & Acquisitions Librarian

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